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‘I Am Willing to Take a Bullet for You. Are You Willing to Go on Strike for Me?’
At the beginning of February, thousands of public hospital workers in Hong Kong staged a weeklong strike in response to the coronavirus outbreak. Led by the newly formed Hospital Authority Employee Alliance (HAEA), the workers demanded that the local government ensure an adequate supply of masks, increase the number of isolation wards in hospitals, provide better support for doctors and…

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‘Ruin Our Territory—for What?’
The date is etched into the memory of Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chief Na’Moks: December 11, 1997.1 That’s the day when the Supreme Court of Canada recognized that the Indigenous nations of the Wet’suwet’en and Gitxsan had never agreed to give up their ancestral territory in northern British Columbia. The Delgamuukw ruling, as the decision was called, said that the province could…

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Those Shoes Were Made by a Uighur Detainee
Mustafa Aksu’s hometown is in an area punctuated by billowy fields of cotton, an agricultural prefecture of the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region in far western China. As a child growing up in the 1990s, Aksu watched as middle-school-aged Uighur girls around him left Xinjiang under duress to work in garment factories in other parts of the country.

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Inside Trump’s Divisive Mission to Identify and Deter Potential Extremists
Boston’s Roxbury neighborhood is a historically black part of the city, straddling a blighted past and a gentrifying future. It is home to some of Massachusetts’s oldest colonial sites and a large Somali community; it also has one of Boston’s highest crime rates. Police officers frequent its streets, squares, and transit hubs, enforcing a citywide stop-and-frisk program.

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Indigenous Rights Are Trudeau’s Last Priority
As we speak, Canadian paramilitary and police forces are occupying parts of the sovereign territories of the Indigenous Wet’suwet’en, Gitxsan, and Mohawk peoples. This is their attempt to stamp out the blockades, protests, and occupations that Indigenous people and their supporters have set up across the country. Protesters have shut down commuter rail services in Vancouver, parts of Montreal, and…

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How Rising Temperatures Increase the Likelihood of Nuclear War
President Donald Trump may not accept the scientific reality of climate change, but the nation’s senior military leaders recognize that climate disruption is already underway, and they are planning extraordinary measures to prevent it from spiraling into nuclear war. One particularly worrisome scenario is if extreme drought and abnormal monsoon rains devastate agriculture and unleash social chaos in Pakistan, potentially…

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One Uighur Man‘s Circuitous Journey to Safety
Ablikim Yusuf never imagined he would see America. Born in Hotan, an oasis town in arid Xinjiang province, he spent most of his life in China. In 2013 he moved to Pakistan for work, where, until recently, he expected to remain.1 But on the second Sunday in August 2019, after a whiplash series of life-altering events, Yusuf, a member of…

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The Global Garbage Economy Begins (And Ends) In This Senegalese Dump
The polypropylene container, or jerrycan, is a familiar sight across Senegal. Savvy businessmen sell pilfered petrol from it, hawking it to drivers waiting in long queues for fuel. The women who run salons carry it to their businesses, ensuring they can still run their generators should the electricity go. It can be a vessel for water or palm oil; a…

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California’s Fires Prove the American Dream Is Flammable
This fall, California residents awakened to a new reality of inconvenience and terror. In early October, the utility companies Pacific Gas and Electric, San Diego Gas and Electric, and Southern California Edison all announced precautionary power shutoffs for thousands of customers, prompted by especially hot, dry conditions and forecasts for strong winds.