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How Rising Temperatures Increase the Likelihood of Nuclear War
President Donald Trump may not accept the scientific reality of climate change, but the nation’s senior military leaders recognize that climate disruption is already underway, and they are planning extraordinary measures to prevent it from spiraling into nuclear war. One particularly worrisome scenario is if extreme drought and abnormal monsoon rains devastate agriculture and unleash social chaos in Pakistan, potentially…

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One Uighur Man‘s Circuitous Journey to Safety
Ablikim Yusuf never imagined he would see America. Born in Hotan, an oasis town in arid Xinjiang province, he spent most of his life in China. In 2013 he moved to Pakistan for work, where, until recently, he expected to remain.1 But on the second Sunday in August 2019, after a whiplash series of life-altering events, Yusuf, a member of…

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The Global Garbage Economy Begins (And Ends) In This Senegalese Dump
The polypropylene container, or jerrycan, is a familiar sight across Senegal. Savvy businessmen sell pilfered petrol from it, hawking it to drivers waiting in long queues for fuel. The women who run salons carry it to their businesses, ensuring they can still run their generators should the electricity go. It can be a vessel for water or palm oil; a…

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California’s Fires Prove the American Dream Is Flammable
This fall, California residents awakened to a new reality of inconvenience and terror. In early October, the utility companies Pacific Gas and Electric, San Diego Gas and Electric, and Southern California Edison all announced precautionary power shutoffs for thousands of customers, prompted by especially hot, dry conditions and forecasts for strong winds.

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It’s Not Enough to Topple a Dictator
Khartoum, Sudan—Samahir Mubarak walked through the empty streets of Khartoum on April 11. She was crestfallen. She thought she’d be marching against the regime of dictator Omar al-Bashir with her countrymen. Instead, she wandered alone. The resistance, she thought, had been broken. Mubarak watched a boy kick up dirt as he walked to the middle of the road.

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‘We Are So Much More Than Victims’
The borders of our world cut not only across international boundaries, they also increasingly stretch deeply into the interior of nations—into our homes, cities, communities, courts, and everyday interactions. Citizenship status, visa status, vulnerability to deportation—these are just a few of the dividing lines increasingly separating our country into different communities with starkly different options for how or if its…

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India: Intimations of an Ending
While protest reverberates on the streets of Chile, Catalonia, Britain, France, Iraq, Lebanon, and Hong Kong, and a new generation rages against what has been done to their planet, I hope you will forgive me for speaking about a place where the street has been taken over by something quite different.

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Surviving Indonesia’s Antigay Clampdown
When Nadia met Rana at a 7-Eleven in Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia, it was love at first sight.1 Nadia, who is now 23, had moved to the city from her hometown a couple of hours away to study at an Islamic university. She had recently broken up with a high school boyfriend, Imam, turned off by his abusive behavior.

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Bolivia’s Coup Is Still Happening
On Tuesday, the right-wing Bolivian politician Jeanine Áñez held an exceedingly large Bible in her hand and declared herself interim president of Bolivia. That same day, soldiers roamed the streets of La Paz, bearing rifles while military jets swooped low over the capital city, temporarily drowning out the sounds of protesters.